International Journal of Academic Research and Development

International Journal of Academic Research and Development


International Journal of Academic Research and Development
International Journal of Academic Research and Development
Vol. 5, Issue 5 (2020)

Impact of climate change on sustainable agriculture and food security in India


Kiran Sudi

Climate Change is the biggest threat to sustainable development in India. It has affected the Indian agriculture production. There is growing indication that climate change has negative effects on agriculture performance in India. Agriculture sector contributes about one-third of the greenhouse gas emissions; it contributes significantly to climate change mitigation. The agriculture sector is the largest water absorption about 70 per cent of total withdrawal globally. The agriculture sector is also a major source of water pollution that emerges from nutrients, pesticides, soils and other contaminants, leading to significant social, economic and environmental degradation. The majority of the rural population depends on climate-sensitive sectors like agriculture and its allied sector for their livelihood in the country. The adverse impact of climate-changing the form of change in rainfall patterns, rising temperatures increased the severity of the droughts and floods threaten food security and livelihood in the country. The success of the Green Revolution has become created a new set of agriculture crisis in the country. It has led to high consumption of tube well irrigation, high subsidy on fertilizers and pesticides consumption of high level of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. India has the largest area in terms of irrigated land (61.71 million hectares) of which about one-third land is already degraded and 7 million hectares has been abandoned. In such a situation sustainable agriculture is the only solution for successful agricultural revolution. The agriculture sector is also a major source of water pollution that emerges from nutrients, pesticides, soils and other contaminants, leading to significant social, economic and environmental degradation. The majority of the rural population depends on climate-sensitive sectors like agriculture and its allied sector for their livelihood in the country.
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